3rd Singapore Literature Festival in NYC
(October 4-6, 2018)

FESTIVAL THEME: “SAY IT DIFFERENTLY”

Thursday, October 4, 2018 - Day One

The Anthologist’s Dream
Thursday, October 4, 2018, 2:30–4:00 pm, Adelphi University, University Center 313, Garden City, NY. Co-presented by Adelphi University as a part of the Soapbox Series roundtable discussions.

Ng Yi-Sheng, Danielle Barnhart, and Martha Cooley. Moderated by Rachel Dean.

The rise of literary anthologies in Singapore and in the USA is an exciting phenomenon. The genre questions the limits of single-author works, and is in turn questioned with regard to format and inclusivity. How are anthologies conceived, developed, and edited? Who chooses--or is chosen--to develop and edit an anthology? How, and why?

The panelists are in a unique position to answer these questions. Ng Yi-Sheng is a poet, playwright, and fictionist, as well as the editor of two groundbreaking anthologies of queer stories and a collection of subverted Asian fairy tales. Danielle Barnhart and her co-editor Iris Mahan conceived and edited an anthology with a feminist ethos that cuts across race, gender identity, and sexuality. Martha Cooley is developing a multi-genre anthology of responses to Italian author Italo Calvino’s Six Memos for the Next Millennium.

Free and open to the public. Book signing after the event. Light refreshment sponsored by Adelphi University's MFA program.


Passion and the Art of Fiction (Opening Night)
Thursday, October 4, 2018, 7:00–9:00 pm, Asia Society, 725 Park Avenue, at 70th Street. Co-presented by Asia Society.

Hari Kunzru and Balli Kaur Jaswal. Moderated by Tanya Agathocleous.

We live in a time of political and environmental crisis when passions run high on all sides. The contemporary novelist must take into account public as well as private emotions and their creative and destructive potential. This imaginative task can be complicated when the author is an immigrant, divided between their birthplace and their country of residence. Is this divide conducive or inhibitive of writing about a force so atavistic yet urgent as passion? Two writers of the Indian diaspora, Hari Kunzru (White Tears) and Balli Kaur Jaswal (Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows) read from their latest work and discuss their imaginative relation to passion, vocation, and obsession with postcolonial and transnational literature scholar Tanya Agathocleous.

RSVP here.

Free and open to the public. Wine reception and book signing after the event.



Friday, October 5, 2018 - Day Two

Balli Kaur Jaswal at The Brearley School
Friday, October 5, 2018, 9.50–10.20 am, The Brearley School, 610 E 83rd Street, NY, NY. Co-presented by Brearley's Upper School Creative Writing Club and Asian Awareness Committee.

Singaporean author Balli Kaur Jaswal will read from her novel Sugarbread about a young Punjabi girl growing up in Singapore. After the reading she will talk about her writing process and the place of her racial and ethnic identity in it.

Free admission. Open to Brearley faculty, staff, and students only.


Singapore: From Non-Alignment to Neutrality
Friday, October 5, 2018, 4:00–5:30 pm, New York University, The Event Space, 244 Greene Street, 1st Floor, New York, NY. Co-presented by NYU's Postcolonial, Race & Diaspora Colloquium.

Ng Yi-Sheng, Manish Melwani, and Joanna Phua. Moderated by Saronik Bosu and Heba Jahama.

During the Cold War, Singapore was a member of the Non-Aligned Movement, which sought to form a counterbalance against the Western and Communist blocs. Nowadays, Singapore is regularly perceived as a “neutral territory” for the meetings of world leaders, including the Trump-Kim summit. Its critics, both local and abroad, charge that the country has never been neutral. It is, instead, a space of political contest, both within and without. How do the country’s writers respond to the various forms of state control without falling in with a Eurocentric view of the world? How do they negotiate with American cultural dominance without reiterating the politics of Singaporean exceptionalism? Is there a place, in literature and politics, for neutrality? If not, what is the alternative?

RSVP here.

Free and open to the public. Book signing after the event. Reception sponsored by Professor Jini Kim Watson, English Department, NYU.


Friday Night Double Bill
Friday, October 5, 2018, 7:00-10:00 pm, National Black Theater, 2031 5th Avenue, at 125th Street, Harlem, NY.

(I) Play and the Art of Poetry
Vijay Seshadri, Stephanie Burt, and Ng Yi-Sheng. Moderated by Jenny Xie.

Jokes, irony, allusions, doing something for its own sake—play courts misunderstanding, sidelining and, even, contempt. It seems too light, too trivial, for the serious problems of the world. Yet, because of its close attention to form and language, poetry is necessarily playful. Like a child, it is delighted by a rhyme. Like a comedian, it works hard at just the right timing. To explore how poetry and play may rejuvenate the prevailing social and political discourse, three poets, Vijay Seshadri (3 Sections), Stephanie Burt (Advice from the Lights), and Ng Yi-Sheng (A Book of Hims) read from their work and discuss the uses, and the limits, of play with poet Jenny Xie.

(II) Medea by Cake Theatrical Productions (Singapore)
Directed by Natalie Hennedige. Starring Noorlinah Mohd. Talkback moderated by Ruth Tang.

A foreigner from an ancient civilization, Medea becomes the perpetual outsider in a city defined by self-proclaimed civility and rule of law. When her husband deserts her to marry the daughter of the city’s Premier, she is left utterly displaced. Facing imminent exile with nothing save the skin on her back, she redirects her anguish into vengeance, punishes her enemies and horrifies the populace by spilling the blood of her own children on their very ground.

Cake’s creation of Medea materializes at the intersection of myth and contemporary turbulence. One of the most fascinating mythological figures of all time, Medea has come to be a symbol for the marginalized in almost every religious and cultural context. Ever resonant, Medea’s myth reverberates from the fringes where the alarming cries of the oppressed warn of the shattering consequences of their defiance.

RSVP here.

Friday Night Double Bill is free and open to the public. Patrons are encouraged to attend both parts of the evening. Book signing during the intermission. Reception sponsored by Graywolf Press. Door donations go towards the Singapore Unbound Fellowship to bring an emerging Singaporean writer to New York.

 

Saturday, October 6, 2018 - Day Three

Saturday Matinee Double Bill
Saturday, October 6, 2018, 2:00-5:00 pm, National Black Theater, 2031 5th Avenue, at 125th Street, Harlem, NY.

(I) Defiant Love: From Nigeria and Singapore
Balli Kaur Jaswal and Chinelo Okparanta. Moderated by Naomi Jackson.

Tired of Romeo and Juliet? From Nigeria and Singapore come two fighting love stories. In their very different ways, both novels Under the Udala Trees by Chinelo Okparanta and Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows by Balli Kaur Jaswal defy the common expectations placed on love and literature. In conversation with novelist Naomi Jackson, the two authors discuss the relationship between fiction, fantasy, and fact, and the challenges of being a woman writer.

(II) Medea by Cake Theatrical Productions (Singapore)
Directed by Natalie Hennedige. Starring Noorlinah Mohd. Talkback moderated by Ruth Tang.

A foreigner from an ancient civilization, Medea becomes the perpetual outsider in a city defined by self-proclaimed civility and rule of law. When her husband deserts her to marry the daughter of the city’s Premier, she is left utterly displaced. Facing imminent exile with nothing save the skin on her back, she redirects her anguish into vengeance, punishes her enemies and horrifies the populace by spilling the blood of her own children on their very ground.

Cake’s creation of Medea materializes at the intersection of myth and contemporary turbulence. One of the most fascinating mythological figures of all time, Medea has come to be a symbol for the marginalized in almost every religious and cultural context. Ever resonant, Medea’s myth reverberates from the fringes where the alarming cries of the oppressed warn of the shattering consequences of their defiance.

RSVP here.

Saturday Matinee Double Bill is free and open to the public. Patrons are encouraged to attend both parts of the evening. Book signing during the intermission. Reception sponsored by Benety Goh and Shirley Fang. Door donations go towards the Singapore Unbound Fellowship to bring an emerging Singaporean writer to New York.


Saturday Night Double Bill
Saturday, October 6, 2018, 7:00-10:00 pm, National Black Theater, 2031 5th Avenue, at 125th Street, Harlem, NY.

(I) Stories from Alfian Sa’at’s Malay Sketches
Directed by Zizi Azah Abdul Majid. Talkback moderated by Kai Sundermann.

Precise yet universal, grounded yet probing, Malay Sketches opens a prismatic window into the doubly minoritized Malay-Muslim community in Singapore. Alternating between flash fiction and longer ruminative stories, Alfian Sa’at adopts the role of compassionate and creative demographer, tracing the inner lives of his fictional characters as they navigate individual and collective nostalgias, religious piety and doubt, and issues of class and race. In this dramatic reading of selected stories from the collection, director Zizi Azah Abdul Majid and her actors will bring to life these narrative gems.

(II) Medea by Cake Theatrical Productions (Singapore)
Directed by Natalie Hennedige. Starring Noorlinah Mohd. Talkback moderated by Kai Sundermann.

A foreigner from an ancient civilization, Medea becomes the perpetual outsider in a city defined by self-proclaimed civility and rule of law. When her husband deserts her to marry the daughter of the city’s Premier, she is left utterly displaced. Facing imminent exile with nothing save the skin on her back, she redirects her anguish into vengeance, punishes her enemies and horrifies the populace by spilling the blood of her own children on their very ground.

Cake’s creation of Medea materializes at the intersection of myth and contemporary turbulence. One of the most fascinating mythological figures of all time, Medea has come to be a symbol for the marginalized in almost every religious and cultural context. Ever resonant, Medea’s myth reverberates from the fringes where the alarming cries of the oppressed warn of the shattering consequences of their defiance.

RSVP here.

Saturday Night Double Bill is free and open to the public. Patrons are encouraged to attend both parts of the evening. Book signing during the intermission. Reception sponsored by Patsey Yeo-Ramaker. Door donations go towards the Singapore Unbound Fellowship to bring an emerging Singaporean writer to New York.



Pre-Festival Events

Two-Tongued: Bilingualism in Literature
Wednesday, October 3, 2018, 1:00-2.30 pm, Stony Brook University, NY.

Ng Yi-Sheng and E.K. Tan.

This event brings together a writer and a scholar from Singapore to discuss the role of bilingualism in literature. Writer Ng Yi-Sheng and Professor E.K. Tan will address the following issues related to the topic: What is bilingual literature? What are some themes that are common in bilingual writings? Does bilingualism in literature undermine or reproduce language hierarchy? Do most postcolonial literatures comprise bilingual or multilingual characteristics? Please join us in this special occasion to participate in a dialogue in which the practice of bilingualism in literature meets its theorization.

Free admission. Open to Stony Brook faculty, staff, and students only. Book signing after the event. Reception sponsored by Stony Brook University, Department of English and Department of Asian and Asian American Studies.


Opening Party
Wednesday, October 3, 2018, 7:00–9:00 pm, a home in Harlem

Madeleine Thien reads from her latest novel, Do Not Say We Have Nothing, which won the Scotiabank Giller Prize and the Governor-General’s Literary Award for Fiction, and was shortlisted for the 2016 Man Booker Prize.

By invitation only. Reception sponsored by Ethos Books (Singapore).

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Authors and Artists

Balli Kaur Jaswal is the author of Inheritance, which won the Sydney Morning Herald’s Best Young Australian Novelist Award in 2014, and Sugarbread, a finalist for the 2015 inaugural Epigram Books Fiction Prize. She has been a writer-in-residence at the University of East Anglia and Nanyang Technological University. Her third novel Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows (Harper Collins/William Morrow) was released internationally in March 2017, with film rights sold to Ridley Scott's production company, Scott Free Productions, and Film Four in the UK. Jaswal lives in Singapore, where she is currently working on her PhD in English and Creative Writing. 

Led by Natalie Hennedige, Cake Theatrical Productions is a contemporary performance company based in Singapore. Cake’s works are staged in conventional theaters as well as outdoor public spaces. From intimate theater experiments to lush outdoor spectacles, Cake is committed to exploring the possibilities of performance, offering pieces that are varied, multidisciplinary, and artistically adventurous.

Chinelo Okparanta is the author of Happiness, Like Water and Under the Udala Trees. Her honors include two Lambda Literary Awards, an O. Henry Prize, and finalist selections for the NYPL Young Lions Fiction Award, the International DUBLIN Literary Award, and the Etisalat Prize for Literature. She has been nominated for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award and the NAACP Image Award in Fiction. In 2017, she was named a Granta's Best of Young American Novelist and a Distinguished Immigrant by the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

Along with Iris Mahan, Danielle Barnhart is a founding editor of Village of Crickets, a literary website. She is the recipient of Adelphi University’s 2015 Donald Everett Axinn Award in Poetry, and coordinates literary programming for Adelphi’s MFA Program in Creative Writing.

Hari Kunzru is the author of five novels, including Gods Without Men (2011) and White Tears (2017). His short stories and essays have appeared in diverse publications including The New York Times, New Yorker, Guardian, London Review of Books, Granta, Book Forum, and Frieze. He was a 2008 Cullman Fellow at the New York Public Library, a 2014 Guggenheim Fellow and a 2015 Fellow of the American Academy in Berlin. In 2014 he was made a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. Born in London, he lives in New York City.

Joanna Phua is Ph.D. candidate in Political Science at The Graduate Center, City University of New York. Trained as an inter-disciplinary scholar in both international relations and urban theory, she works on the politics of foreign assistance, especially technological aid for infrastructure building and urban development. Using her concept of “techno-power,” she analyzes how states like China, India, and Singapore leverage their technological capabilities for political gain in international politics and urban society.

Madeleine Thien was born in Vancouver, the daughter of Malaysian-Chinese immigrants to Canada. Her most recent novel, Do Not Say We Have Nothing, about art, music and revolution in 20th century China, won the Scotiabank Giller Prize and the Governor-General’s Literary Award for Fiction, and was shortlisted for the 2016 Man Booker Prize, the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction, and The Folio Prize. Her books and stories have been translated into 25 languages and her essays have appeared in The GuardianGrantaThe New York Times, and elsewhere. She is professor of English at Brooklyn College.

Manish Melwani is a Singaporean writer. He attended the Clarion Writers’ Workshop in 2014, and recently completed his MA at NYU’s Gallatin School, where he studied science fiction and fantasy, postcolonial studies, and the maritime history of Singapore. His academic research traced the British Empire’s persistent influence on English-language science fiction and fantasy. He also wrote a collection of supernatural stories set over 700 years of Singaporean history. Manish’s fiction has been published in Lontar: The Journal of Southeast Asian Speculative Fiction and in the Shirley Jackson Award-winning anthology Shadows and Tall Trees.

Martha Cooley is the author of two novels, The Archivist (a national bestseller also published in a dozen foreign markets) and Thirty-Three Swoons, as well as a memoir, Guesswork. She is the co-translator of Antonio Tabucchi’s story collection Time Ages in a Hurry. Her essays, short fiction, and translations have appeared in numerous literary journals.

Natalie Hennedige is the Artistic Director of Cake Theatrical Productions, a contemporary performance company based in Singapore. A recipient of the National Arts Council Young Artist Award in 2007 and the JCCI Singapore Foundation Culture Award in 2010, Natalie conceptualises, writes, and directs works in theatre and other media. Constantly collaborating with artists from across disciplines such as visual arts, film and video, performance art, and dance, Natalie engineers contemporary works that are artistically adventurous, playing at conventional theatrical venues and unusual public spaces to create performance-based experiences.

Ng Yi-Sheng is a Singaporean poet, playwright, fictionist, critic, journalist and LGBT+ activist. His books include the poetry collections last boy (winner of the Singapore Literature Prize 2008), Loud Poems for a Very Obliging Audience, and A Book of Hims, as well as the film novelization Eating Air. Additionally, he translated Wong Yoon Wah’s Chinese poetry collection The New Village and has co-edited anthologies such as GASPP: a Gay Anthology of Singaporean Poetry and Prose and Eastern Heathens: Asian Folklore Subverted. Winner of the first Singapore Poetry Slam in 2003, he co-organizes the annual cultural and activist festival IndigNation.

Noorlinah Mohd is an award-winning actress of stage, television, and film. As an actress, she has worked in Singapore as well as Asia, Europe and the US. She is also a teaching artist, and a consultant in arts pedagogy with a PhD in Arts Education from the University of Warwick. She was the Director of The O.P.E.N., the pre-festival of ideas and public engagement initiative of the Singapore International Festival of Arts (2014-2017). Noorlinah is a recipient of the JCCI Cultural Award (2008) and the Women’s Weekly Women of our Time Award (2005) for her contributions to the arts.

Stephanie (also Stephen and Steph) Burt is the author of three poetry collections, Belmont, Parallel Play, and Popular Music, and several collections of critical works. Her essay collection Close Calls with Nonsense was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Her other works include Advice from the LightsThe Poem is You: 60 Contemporary American Poems and How to Read ThemThe Art of the Sonnet; Something Understood: Essays and Poetry for Helen Vendler; The Forms of Youth: Adolescence and 20th Century Poetry; Parallel Play: Poems; Randall Jarrell on W. H. Auden; and Randall Jarrell and His Age. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times Book Review, the London Review of Books, the Times Literary Supplement, The Believer, and the Boston Review.

Vijay Seshadri is the author of Wild Kingdom (1996); The Long Meadow (2003), which won the James Laughlin Award; and 3 Sections (2013), which won the Pulitzer Prize in Poetry. He has received fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, the NEA, and the Guggenheim Foundation. He has worked as an editor at the New Yorker and has taught at Sarah Lawrence College, where he currently directs the graduate non-fiction writing program.

Zizi Azah Abdul Majid is a playwright-director whose plays advocate for a shared humanity through a feminist lens. Her plays have been staged in Singapore, Malaysia and China. Productions she had directed include performances that were part of the Singapore Arts Festival, the Journey Beijing Festival, the M1 Fringe Festival as well as the Singapore Theatre Festival. For five years, Zizi served as Artistic Director of Teater Ekamatra (Singapore), the only woman ever to helm the theater company in its 29-year history. Her work has been nominated for multiple awards at the Life! Theatre Awards (Singapore) and in 2012, she was conferred the Young Artist Award in recognition of her significant contributions to Singapore theater. She is currently pursuing her MFA in Playwriting at Columbia University.

Moderators

E.K. Tan is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature in the Department of English and the Department of Asian and Asian American Studies. He is the author of Rethinking Chineseness: Translational Sinophone Identities in the Nanyang Literary World (2013) and articles published in Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, Journal of Modern Chinese Literature, Journal of Chinese Cinemas, Journal of World Chinese Literature, and others. His current projects include two manuscripts tentatively titled Queer Homecoming in Sinophone Cultures: Translocal Remapping of Kinship and Mandarinization and Its Impact on Sinophone Cultural Production: A Transcolonial Comparison of Ethnic China, Singapore and Taiwan.

Heba Jahama received her BA at The College of New Jersey and is currently pursuing a PhD in English at New York University. Her interests include postcolonial studies, queer theory, and literature of Africa and the Middle East.

Jenny Xie is the author of Eye Level (Graywolf Press), recipient of the 2017 Walt Whitman Award of the Academy of American Poets, and Nowhere to Arrive (Northwestern University Press), recipient of the Drinking Gourd Chapbook Prize. She has received fellowships and support from Kundiman, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, the Elizabeth George Foundation, and Poets & Writers. She teaches at New York University.

A School Of The Arts Singapore alumnus, Kai Sundermann reads anthropology and performance studies at NYU Gallatin, exploring the interstitial spaces between dramaturgy, ethnography, critical theory, and theatrical direction. He recently directed and produced Alfian Sa’at’s Optic Trilogy at the Alchemical Studios, and is thrilled to be a part of this celebration of Singaporean stories.

Naomi Jackson is author of The Star Side of Bird Hill. Star Side was nominated for an NAACP Image Award, longlisted for the National Book Critics Circle’s John Leonard Prize and the International Dublin Literary Award, and named an Honor Book for Fiction by the Black Caucus of the American Library Association. Jackson studied fiction at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

Rachel Dean is an MFA candidate at Adelphi University. She writes fiction and nonfiction.

Ruth Tang (she/they) is a playwright and poet. Her short play "Bad Chinese" was selected for the 2018 Samuel French Off-Off-Broadway Festival. She is working on an MFA in Playwriting at the New School for Drama and lives, depending on the time of year, in Singapore and New York City.

Saronik Bosu is a doctoral student in the Department of English, New York University. Focusing on India between independence in 1947 and economic liberalization in 1991, his purpose is to subject political economic thought to literary criticism and to investigate how such thought, in its turn, has occasioned the production of literatures. Saronik received his B.A. degree from Presidency College, Kolkata, and his M.A. and M.Phil. degrees from Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi.

Tanya Agathocleous is Associate Professor of English at Hunter College and the Graduate Center, CUNY, where she teaches classes on Victorian literature and on colonial and postcolonial studies. She is the author of Urban Realism and the Cosmopolitan Imagination (Cambridge, 2011), a Broadview edition of Joseph Conrad’s The Secret Agent, a Penguin enhanced edition of Great Expectations, a YA biography of George Orwell, and several academic articles on nineteenth-century literature in global, transnational and imperial contexts. She has also written for Public Books and LARB.

Co-Presenters

We are proud to partner with the following organizations to present this year’s festival.

Sponsors

Special thanks to our festival supporters

BENEFACTOR
Traslin Ong and Kelvin Neu, Anonymous

FAN
Benety Goh, Boon Hui Tan, Hoe Fang Fong (Ethos Books), Hui Wen Lim, Karen Lim, Patsey Yeo-Ramaker

SUPPORTER
Frank Pomilla, Geoffrey Yu, Guy Humphrey, Kai Chai Yeow, Lyn Chio, Paul Rozario-Falcone, Sherri Wolf, Susan Sagor in honor of Robert Koh Dut Say (1937–2018), Tai Ann Koh, Tim Tompkins

FRIEND
Alex Goh, Andrew Howdle, Chinelo Okparanta, Elsa Yow, Faith Pek, Jini Kim Watson, Karisa Poedjirahardjo, Laura Cook, Lawrence Reutens, Luis Francia, Lynn Hailey, Megan Lui, Paul Rozario-Falcone and Alphonse Falcone in memory of Robert Koh Dut Say (1937–2018), Phillipe St. Luce, Ray Briggs, Rodger and Sandy Woock, Song-Khoon Lim, Stewart Dorward, Susan M. Ingmire, Timothy Hawkins, Tzu Pheng Lee, Verena Tay, Winston Lin

BACKER
Angus Whitehead, Brian Bernards, Caroline Chang, Cheow Thia Chan, Chris Huntington, Christina Newhard, Damon Chua, Donna Smith, Feng Zhu, Helaine Smith, Heyden White, Jason Irwin, Jessica Baron, Jim Mulkin, Karen Gwee, Kelly Chan, Kwon Chan, Lavon Wong, Liew Geok Leong, Lourdes Tomlinson, Miho Kinnas, Mei Ann Teo, Melinda Lauw, Nicholas Wong, Norah She+Pride, Rob and Lynne Wu-Gilson, Roy Lee, SJ Rozan, Sohrab Homi Fracis, Sudhir Vadaketh, Yonji Kim

Additional thanks to our business sponsors

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Started in 2014, the biennial Singapore Literature Festival in NYC is an independent, volunteer-run event that brings together Singaporean and American authors, scholars, and audiences for in-depth conversations about literature and society. The inaugural festival featured 14 authors, including Haresh Sharma, Wena Poon, Cyril Wong, and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan.

The 2nd edition of the festival took place from September 28 – October 1, 2016. Festival authors and artists included Alfian Sa’at, Ovidia Yu, Jeremy Tiang, Marcus Yi, Mei Ann Teo, and Jason Wee (from Singapore), and Jessica Hagedorn, Gina Apostol, SJ Rozan, Jason Koo, Naomi Jackson, and Douglas Wolk (from the USA).

View Past Festival Program

 
 

3rd Festival Organizing Committee (2018)

Organizer and Fundraiser
Jee Leong Koh
Arts Consultant
Maureen Hoon
Design Consultant
Flora Chan
Community Engagement
Magdalene Sim and Jia Sing Chu
Event Managers 
Kimberley Lim and Hong-Ling Wee
Video Director & Producer
Chia Lynn Kwa
Photographers
Charisse Foo and Alejandra Arevalo

2nd Festival Organizing Committee (2016)

Organizer 
Jee Leong Koh
Communications & Non-Profit Arts Consultant
Maureen Hoon
Design Consultant 
Flora Chan
Fundraiser
Hong-Ling Wee
Drama Producer 
Marcus Yi
Event Managers 
Kimberley Lim, Bonnie Bee, and Genevieve Lim
Video Director & Producer 
Tomson Tee

Inaugural Festival Organizing Committee (2014)

Co-Chairs 
Paul Rozario-Falcone and Jee Leong Koh
Fundraiser 
Damon Chua
Publicity 
Kimberley Lim, Kenneth Lim, and Kiat-Sing Teo
Event Managers 
Kimberley Lim, Marcus Yi, and Kiat-Sing Teo
Graphics
Shellen Teh
Video/Photography 
Marcus Yi